Peace Pangs and Pain of Partition, Candle Lit Freedom at Midnight ———– By Rashmi Talwar

Candle Lit Vigil on Indo Pak /Wagah Attari /Border in Amritsar -2012


RISING KASHMIR FRONT PAGE – 17 AUG 2012 Indo Pak Candle Lit Vigil /Wagah Attari /Amritsar –


Peace Pangs and Pain of Partition, Candle Lit Freedom at Midnight ———– By Rashmi Talwar
On the Midnight of August 14-15, a candle in hand, I walk with peaceniks, to Wagah-Attari Indo-Pak Joint check post in Amritsar. The tearing border of yore, on this particular day, is beauteously bridal showered.

Dark trees, shrubs draped in twinkling drops of fairy lights and strings of glitzy flags, transform the stringent security postures and the night’s gloom into a bejeweled bride, festooned for the Independence Day Celebrations of India and Pakistan- the two countries who had chosen to separate but cannot wish away their umbical cord or get over their shared history.

Like a wedding shagun, a basket of fruits and sweets arrive from Pakistan to India and the gesture is reciprocated the next morning by India to Pak.

It is the 17th year by Peace activists as well as organizations ‘Folklore Research Academy’ (FRA), ‘Hind Pak Dosti Manch’ , ‘Punjab Jagriti Manch’, that conceived the idea of Candle lit Vigil annually on this momentous occasion of Freedom, at a time when one country’s dusk coincided with dawn of the other.

Lighting candles had come as a symbolic gesture of peace between two clanking forbidding Gates – an unspoken barrier of no trespass! That open every morning and close by sunset.

The idea of candle lit vigil was infact a simplistic emotional call for friendship, sharing pains of separation, longing hearts and prayer for harmony on the midnight of Freedom. It started as a friendship mela at Wagah, in memory of Raja Porus a common hero for denizens of both countries.

I reached a little early, giving me the luxury of retrospect. Gaping at the peeking moon, beaming in its full circular glory, through diaphanous clouds, it made me wonder if there shone a moon on those sultry, bloody August nights of 1947. The nights of stealth, loot, rape, fear, blood screams and surrenders to the greatest inhumanity to shake the Earth, leaving millions homeless, naked and paupered.

I wondered was this, one of the routes traversed by those loaded bullock carts, donkeys, sheep and goats and teeming millions, household buckets brimful with oddities, weary animals, to have written their footsteps in blood, crossing the Cyril Radcliff line.

“Did they fold their hands in prayer looking at the sky for a savior or in thanksgiving, for being alive?” Starving, in tatters, lost and bewildered as to what this meant for their future.

The cities, towns and villages quivering at their changed destinies, shuffled like a pack of cards, by a single stroke of a pen, of the reigning regime of the English; fearful of the bottomless pits of depravity by human-turned animals.

I looked askance at the trees, “Why did you stand as mute spectators to the bloodshed of innocents waylaid by mobs, blood curdling screams of many a fair maiden carried away in a frenzy of lust and fury?”

I had heard of many a head of the family’s frozen turbulence, in putting their girls and woman on the sacrificial altar, cutting their heads with a swift stroke of a sword and the bloodied heads, rolling onto male feet. Brave some women stood with chilled faces witnessing the, ‘nanga nachch of vaishiyaat’ (naked dance of death)…

I stilled these stirrings….

Tonight was different, guards had been raised, and BSF personnel guarded at every 50 steps.
A threatening barbed wire fence loomed in the darkness but faces glowed in shimmering fairy lights.
I saw, people had changed !
Perhaps, the wounds healed and generations that faced it all, turned greyer and wiser. “Hatred divides and Peace Unites; There was no third path !”
The call from Indians this time too was answered with solidarity and support from Pakistan’s peaceniks of SAFMA (South Asian Free Media Association). A call for harmony, peace, mutual coexistence, for progress and prosperity through enhanced trade, visitations, easings, release of prisoners on either sides.
Now an annual feature, the candle-lit vigil first started as a trickle say FRA’s leading names Ramesh Yadav and Talwinder Singh; with the first breakthrough of poetical symposium at Wagah Indo-Pak border by Kendri Punjabi Lekhak Sabha in 1993.
Down the years the innocent blaze of candle lights contributed to awaken the political authorities from their self-imposed slumber.
The flag of peace taken forward this time did not include celebrities. Mahesh Bhatt, Tara Gandhi- Mahatma Gandhi’s granddaughter and journalist Kuldip Nayyar were conspicuous by their absence while the cultural programme on the stage too was taken over not by the likes of established singers Harbhajan Mann or Hans Raj Hans, but by blooming youthful singers -Jyoti and Sultana the teenage Noora Sisters of Coke studio fame who unleashed sufi Punjabi music,, bonding the gathering of multitudes that trickled in from border villagers. The crowds swung into a frenzy of music, Bhangra and Buraaah !

Singers Nachattar Gill , Firoz Khan—who sang –‘Sadi Zindagi ch khaas teri thaa, Sochi na tenu dilon kadd ta ..(You have a special place in my heart, think not that my heart has abandoned you ) or “Ravi puchey Chenaab toh , Ki haal hai Satluj da ..” (River Ravi asks river Chenab in Jammu &Kashmir, how is river Satluj -Punjab being the land of five rivers –Panj-five, aab-water ) addressing the Indo Pak separation.

Pak women journalists, an MNA –Member of the National assembly –Tahmina Daultana, Faiza Ahmed Malik –Member state assembly, Awais Sheikh- counsel for Indian prisoners in Pakistan, besides mediapersons made up a medley crowd of representations from Pakistan who stood on the Indian side of the border hand in hand with Indians.

On the stage Raga Boyz –a three member band of brothers and sons of Ustad Hamid Ali Khan –Pak’s Gazal Maestro, drummed out the famed trespasses of naughty ‘Jugni’- the cult female folklore figure , brave and rebellious, bellowing out her antics, to the huge crowd who joined in from adjoining border villages.

Prime Minister Manmohan Singh’s congratulatory note was read. “But what good is word oral or written if changes do not take place on the ground” contended Satnam Manak spearheading the Peace march.

Kargil war in 1999, viewed as a back stabbing operation by Pak , served as a bolt from the blue, for the efforts of peace, close on the heels of the CBM euphoria over improving Indo Pak relations, but peaceniks never gave up .
In its 66th year of Independence, and 17 years of ‘candle lit vigil’ this is only the 5th time that peaceniks from Pakistan were allowed to come near the gate to give momentum to the movement of peace.

And the jubilation turned infections when India’s candles glowed and were waved while Pakistanis took more liberties and stuck the candles in the niches that make up Pakistan’s side of the metal border gate. They even mounted upon the gates, peeking through and singing songs while the Pak Rangers and Border Security Force personnel in India smiled and laughed at their antics indulgently.

Songs of ‘Tere Mere geetan pyaar da Pul bandhna, Iss kaandiyali Tarr ne ek din Phul banna …’ (Our songs shall one day become a bridge, ..this barbed wire shall one day turn into a flower..). singing ‘Heer’- another common legend of love, turned crowds to thump a -bhangra in euphoria.
A 40 member Peacenik delegation from Pakistan and the Indian Peace organizations jointly highlighted the commonalities of Punjabis beyond the dividing line. Making fervent appeals to both nations to shed differences and grant visa-less travel to senior citizens, for a year, especially those who had suffered the pain of the partition.
The call did not end here. It called for visa less travel for under 12 year olds. The idea was brilliant. In other words it called for a grandparent to take their grandchildren to the land of their forefathers and forge a feeling of love amongst those who have no clue about the reasons of enmity, stoked by vested interests whose lifeline lay in continued hostilities.
They called for cutting of expense on weapons and alleviating causes to eradicate poverty, illiteracy, creating better civic infrastructure.
For “setting up visa counters at JCP on both sides to facilitate more travel.” This meant more people to people contact and a chance to remove long festered misgivings and doubts. And to resolve the Kashmir issue amicably.

Unlike Kashmir that still has its Bloodlines intact post partition, Punjab was brutally amputated and separated from the other Punjab.

Just after the candles were lit and had played their part, a rain shower washed the entire dirt floating in the air to bring winds of change for this land of hope. I again stole a glance at the moon that emerged through the spent clouds, its baby face shone more glorious and I prayed it would banish this darkness of hatred forever.
URL of story :http://www.risingkashmir.in/news/peace-pangs-and-pain-of-partition-31716.aspx
FIRST PUBLISHED IN RISING KASHMIR ON FRONT PAGE DATED 17 AUGUST 2012

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18 responses to this post.

  1. Posted by asif ali on September 7, 2012 at 7:06 PM

    My opinion is that the partition was actually a Double Whopper Ad from Burger King, on TV it looked huge and mouth watery, factually its looked like a sorry ass ‘dhabba-style’ burger – Both countries spent their fortune (which is still going strong) on amassing weapons while our streets are becoming a showcase of our war-mongering mentality exposing our poverty.

    I am a believer in the fact that if the politicians and Establishment of both countries are removed from within us, we will see huge progress on both sides of borders, removing the hardened behavior we ‘nurture’ for each other.

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  2. Posted by Aijaz Andrabi on September 7, 2012 at 1:56 PM

    Touching ….. it really is!

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  3. Posted by Asif Ali on September 7, 2012 at 1:55 PM

    Rashmi-ji Congrats on receiving Dual-Nationality….

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  4. Posted by Anu Lalli on September 7, 2012 at 1:55 PM

    Very thoughtfully written.

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  5. Posted by Awais Sheikh on September 7, 2012 at 1:51 PM

    Awais Sheikh Maza aageya je. Wonderful writing. Your heart speaks. Your beauty reflects through your face,your ability reflects through your writing. What a lady. You belong to both countries. You are one world within you. Love to meet you again if I accompany Indian prisoner Bhavesh Kantilal on his release expectedly on 28th Sep. I will stay at Amritsar for two days on my way back from Mumbai. Do you have original photographs of candel lit vigil at Wagha on 14th Aug.

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    • Posted by Rashmi Talwar on September 7, 2012 at 1:53 PM

      :26pm · Unlike · 2

      ‎Awais Sheikh –yes dear I have original photos Anu Lalli provided me some Asif Ali —Dil toh bachcha hai ji !! hahhaha

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  6. Posted by Meenakshi Khosla on September 7, 2012 at 1:49 PM

    Emotions abound .. very subtly you glide through the parts of events unfolding them carefully like a woven piece of hand crafted silk .

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  7. Posted by autar mota on September 5, 2012 at 11:41 PM

    very well written……. kudos.

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  8. Posted by IMTIAZ AHMED SHARIFF on September 4, 2012 at 7:43 PM

    IMTIAZ AHMED SHARIFF:
    @rashmitalwar— wow the power of P peace, pain, and and partition!

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  9. \’Peace pangs\’\’! It\’s the phrase that caught my attention. Pressed for time, I thought I\’d just scan through a bit. And found myself scrolling down the entire piece .. till the very end .. in one 5-min go. Phew!
    It all comes alive, here. The \’\’ .. two countries who had chosen to separate but cannot wish away their umbical cord or get over their shared history.\” And hope eternal \”.. the emotional call for friendship, sharing pains of separation, longing hearts and prayer for harmony .. \”

    It\’s a participant\’s narration of an event. True. But it\’s more, much more. It speaks of a common shared past, of the cultural and ethnic bonds. Above all, it speaks of Hope! Leaving behind the \’\’nanga nachch\’\’, the \’\’.. nights of stealth, loot, rape, fear..\’\’. And gives fresh lease of life to the hearts yearning for Peace, for Harmony, and for Love.

    In places, the writing shows signs of brilliance; evoking pathos that brings a lump to the throat. \’\’.. nanga nachch .. fathers chopping off the heads of their daughters & women..\’\’ It\’s a difficult piece to write, but the writer has done full justice to her task. And leaves the reader e-x-h-a-l-i-n-g … Relief & Hope!

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    • Posted by Rashmi Talwar on September 6, 2012 at 10:06 PM

      Harry ji ….always the dissector . U r a wonderful critic ..it is not about picking n observing … It is more about the entire gamut of feelings that u unfailingly put in ur comment. It is always a great pleasure indeed to read ur exhaustive comments n the way u go through every line n phrase …. Thanks so much fr ur effort n time . I feel v encouraged by the discerning quality of ur comments ….. Thanks again 🙂

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  10. Posted by asif ali on September 4, 2012 at 6:17 PM

    A beautifully written piece laden with tons of positive emotions, your choice of words is perrrfect….bravo

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  11. Rashmi, Its well written. The pain of partition, political compulsion and finally what goes deep inside heart of a commoner. All well said. Keep it up. 🙂

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    • Posted by Rashmi Talwar on September 6, 2012 at 10:12 PM

      Daljit ji …. Everything boils down to the means that r used to achieve an end …. The partition was a colossal senseless bloody episode that became unmanageable … Anger can wrought havoc .. History can throw up millions of small big n medium examples … All around us …Thks fr ur precious comments

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